Tag Archives: Race to the Top

Help is on the way!

by Jacob KirnFor the roughly 40 states preparing to apply for the Race to the Top challenge, help is on the way.

The competition, created by the federal government to award $500 million for early childhood education to states with the best applications, can require sizeable labor hours from state workers.

Official guidelines for applicants will be released later this month. But already early education advocates are urging states to use online resources they’re convinced will help them complete the demanding process. 

These include:

The next few months will be hectic for the states and their benefactors. We know the work will be worth the result: more funding for vital programs that boost school readiness, like Parents as Teachers.

Jacob Kirn is a journalism major at University of Missouri-Columbia and an intern at Parents as Teachers.
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Good intentions: states to apply for federal ed funds

by Jacob Kirn
Used under Creative Commons license

Thirty-seven states and the District of Columbia have announced their intention to apply for federal Race to the Top grants later this year. The program is designed to improve early childhood education across the nation through approved programs like Parents as Teachers by distributing $500 million to the best state contenders.
Is your state going to apply? Thirty-seven of these will:
Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
Colorado (State seeks public feedback for its Race to the Top application)
Connecticut
Delaware (Delaware might get a ‘Baby Race to the Top’ grant)
District of Columbia
Georgia (Governor Deal announces intent to apply for early learning grant)
Hawaii (Hawaii joins early learning Race to the Top)
Idaho
Illinois
Iowa
Kansas (Kansas may apply for federal early learning grant)
Kentucky (Kentucky moves forward with Race to the Top application)
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland (New teacher evaluations pushed forward as part of Race to the Top application)
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska (Nebraska may apply for Race to the Top grants for early-childhood education)
Nevada
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York (State competing in Race to the Top 2)
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania (Pa. to apply for $500 million education grant competition)
Rhode Island
Vermont (Vermont applies for childhood education funds)
Washington
West Virginia (Tomblin: state to apply for Race to the Top education funding)
Wisconsin (Walker indicates state will ‘Race to the Top’ again)
Wyoming (Wyoming may apply for $50 million in early education federal funding)

Jacob Kirn is a journalism major at University of Missouri-Columbia and an intern at Parents as Teachers.

Will your state win the Race to the Top?

by Jacob Kirn

We know it takes both parental involvement and community resources for kids to learn, grow and develop between birth and kindergarten. In recent years funding for early education has diminished, but there is still a need for home visiting programs like Parents as Teachers. 

Data continue to show that many states lag behind in pre-kindergarten education, a large indicator of future educational growth. How does your state compare

Very soon, states can apply for federal grants that will provide extra money for education. There is an opportunity in these grants for early childhood education to gain vital funding. States must compete to win their share of the $500 million Race to the Top grant which will be distributed based on each state’s comprehensive plan to clarify learning standards, ability to create transparent programs and provide for low-income and disadvantaged kids. 

Last year, Delaware and Tennessee won over $600 million in phase one of the competition and 9 other states and the District of Columbia won over $3.4 billion in phase two, although last year’s grants were awarded in a broader category, not just for early childhood education.

It will be crucial that states build a competitive grant application; future parents and their children will depend on it.

Jacob Kirn is a journalism major at the University of Missouri-Columbia and an intern at Parents as Teachers.